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The Conscious Beauty & Wellbeing Podcast
The Conscious Beauty & Wellbeing Podcast

Episode 11 · 6 months ago

Sourcing sustainable & ethical ingredients

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As the shift towards natural beauty is becoming more and more mainstream there is a danger that as the demand for natural skincare increases, so will the demand on the resources that we harvest from the planet. Unregulated and unchecked this can have devasting effects on the environment, wildlife and local farmers.

As brands championing natural ingredients in skincare we have a responsibility to ensure that the ingredients we source are sustainably and ethically sourced.

We’re joined by Shalom Lloyd, founder of Naturally Tribal Skincare to try and delve into the importance of sourcing sustainably and ethically.

Hello and welcome to another episode ofthe conscious, Bety and well being podcast a podcast started by Romabeauty and sepon skin, to shine a light on the conscious beauty and well beingindustry. I am Robi your hostfor to day's episode and I'm draw joined by mygorgeous friend and Coleague summer, ofounder of Sepin skin, and also a loveyo guest today, shelomeLloyd from Naturally Tribal Hellochelom, and no thank you. So much, ladies, werehaving MES exciting to be here. Thank you so much for joining us. So as a shift towards natural beauty isbecoming more and more mainstream. There is a danger that, as the demandfor natural skincare increases so wilh the demand of the resources that wehave harvested from the planet, I'm regulated and unchecked. This canhave devastated Adfix, devastating effects on the environment, the Wailife and the local farmers that produce our ingredients. For example, we onlyhave to look as far as how the demand for palm oil hasimpacted, rangatangs or the emergence of bake through natural ingredientsthat have put you know, a huge, significant strain on plant species soas brand champion natural ingredients and skin care, we have a responsibilityto ensure that the ingredients that we source are sustainably and ethicallysourced. So Chalam we've asked you to join ustoday, because we believe what we understand that you have a lovely,lovely story behind the ingredients. You stors you source and actuallynaturally tribal itself. Could you tell us a little bit about your brandjourney? Thank you again. Thank you so much forhaving me it's really a pleasure to be here and can iy stop by saying that one of the reasons why I'm reallyexcited is to actually be on this podcast with another brand nit's amazing, because it speaks tocollaboration. I speaks to partnership. He speaks to brands working together,Champin each other, it's exciting for me, and I love it and the topic we're talking about today,sustainability and in this context to me, it said- is just simply avoiding t dpletion of naturalresources. And how do we maintain that ecological balance? You know in the world? I'm reallyreally proud of we're both British brands right. The UK. I think it was inJune, W thsat an nineteen when the UK became the first major economy to passa zero net emission law. Okay, where the target, I think the target wirerequire to you, K to bring all greenhouse gas amissions to next zeroByu, O Thusanda, fifty or something so...

...it impasts us all really now, for me, I'm a farmacist byqualification, and I never intended the ones kin, CA, Brante, Chol, H, reasonwhy my company started was because of me being a mother, and those of us whoare mothers know about. You would do anything to protect to nourish, tosupport to guard, to guide your children right and Bein a farmers if thiy'll totallyunderstand the Valy of chemicals in our lives completely and totally understandtheyr different approches to skin Ka. You can take a medical approach,yeonastimal approach on asthetic approach, and there is nothing wrongwith that everything in moderation, but it's all about choice. I've chosen toGod on the natural route, respecting science and nature from me, sciences,nature, nature', science and the story behind my brand is really really simple,where, after going through four cycles of ID yes having my beautiful twins ofMorrow, an Joshwa Joshua was born with seve Xaman. He WASL scratch to he bledhe was totally covered and personally, after going through a Ivif from pumpingmyself with those chemicals, I didn't want to then put more chemicals on thischild. I was Prett prescribed. You know I cought hisown steroids, etc,which I used have to admit to start with, and they were bat. It just didn'tsit well with my conscience, so I started going crazy. Mixing in mykitchen and the ingreetent I chose to use was Sharbatza because it's one ofthose ingudies that tried and tested there ar for generations, Eres manychinnical papers around shepatter and also my experience as a child, bleadsbeing slagtered with sharbuts ar growing. Ok, you know and you'reshining, like someone goon frend egg, on your face type of thing. You know soit's something that I grew up with and trust and from a only to say, Sciential from a scientific aspect is one of the few ingredients. That's an Emmolian,abcrusive and hemitant all in one, so it became naturally then based for myproducts, so mixme in my kitchen stumble across the IIS formula. Threedays later, Joshassqik ben cleared and became what it should have been a thing.Bertan bat was the breath of Matry trival kin here, wow wewl, that's sucha beautiful story. I think it resonates with us. Isn't it Sumewer, because it'sso resonates hi Shalom and thank you for joining us and yeah you're. This isexactly what I was thinking. A shelo was going through her story, it'sresonate so much so that I think wev pretty much an exactly the same journeyfrom a to be to see wherever we are at now and yeah. You absolutely like.We've been through those dages where we've had to use. You know the CarterZone O the steroids. All of that but you're, not it really jost play onyour consciouse and I think you've got it. You've got it spot on there, but it's I mean you've. You youmentioned something which I think is...

...quite important is that you are bynature ascientist, but you have bought that scientific knowledge and you'vecombined it with your brand, but of course, arering more of the side ofnatural absolutely, and I always said to peopleit's it's a choice in this life. EverythingOul do is a choice and it's about what works for you. You know we hear it allthe time the ski is largest opening your body wet he put on. It isimportant, but the human bodyis so different, O the approach to it. Wehave to approach it like we doith medicine. So, for example, simpleexample is when I have a headcache, the only thing that will work for me:Ito Particularl, now Jes right sowor for my husband that'st, because that'swhat works for me. So it's really the same approach taking to skine care isfinding that happy, medium F, finding the right thing that works for you.Every Engli has its place, which would't tis kind one agreeent, because you know a product, exof is ingredients,just know what hurts your skin on? What helps your skin thankfully natual skinghere is not antisigns. Naturaskinkar is science, and I love that that is such aperfect way to sort of just phrase. The whole thing, because we are everythingaround us, is scientific. We've got chemicals around us. I mean you look atwater and that is a chemical COMPA. So you can't say we are not. You know weuse chemicals, it's just about choosing to adopt natural chemicals as Opposto,symthetic or harsh, or perhaps toting cimicals, and putting the ones that aregoing to nourish our skins. On to us now, you talked about sheer butter, andI've had we've both had the privilege of having to look at your productstrying your products when we met Gosh a few years back and you do have the mostbeautiful, beautiful products and sheer butter is one of yourflagship ingredients in the naturally tribal skin care rage and what I thinkreally struck accord with me was when we were talking. Oh Gosh, when we firstmet was bit great lengths, naturally tribal, and you have actually gonethrough to ensure that your share butter is not only sustainable butethical. So and that's kind of what we wanted tofocus on in today's thing is about the importance of sustainable and ethicalingredients, because we've being given this choice, an option to use beautifulnatural ingredients in our formulations. Why is bowing for a sustainableingredient so important? Now more than ever, that's an amazing question and I haveto say that it wasn't. I didn't sit there and think. Oh I've got to go fora sustainable source. My ingredients...

...ethically. To be honest, that's not howit started when the formulation that I made workfor my son I run out of share, but that my reliton to sent me from my jury. SoI went online and bought some Roshet it'll work and you start okay. Maybe the efficacy of listinglies in actually the share that I used. So at the time I was still recking fulltime in the FI was degree industry, and I took some time of work flew back tomy idea. Really Blind, Ollou onl I went to look for was just a sorce. Where canI just buy the Shit Butsa inl come back here d make my products. There was nosustainability to be honest in my thought process at the time yeah. Now it was now getting into the Kingdomof ssam this place. I described it as a little beautiful oasis in the middle ofnowhere. It takes me five hours, TUBPRIVEFOM my bujat essance. I leave afive m in the morning, get there telfuck in the moring and getting to ssan and meeting theseamazing women, showing he indemonstrating how shar butter is made,something I was never really prevy to. I was just used to the end conduct somedabies on their Baks unde, forty degrees heat and the process isintensive. These women were fitter than you and me they look Mbe. You know itto takt energy, and it was at that point that I justhad this epiphany. I Calle it. My whole business took a whole different term. Ithought my goodness wouldn't be a great idea to actually do something with andfor these women. I left that place looking them in the eye and saying Iwill put you on the map. I don't know how gin to do it. I now and came back here to the UK. Like Iwas say my poor husband, setdavid thers, something he well gin to dosomething here and wee. Mortgaged our home wow anwent back to Nigria, started tobuild a factory in six UNR and sixteen acres of land in Ssam, and I'm reallyproud to say that, as of December, two Thsandand, twenty, the factory is non,complete equipment is not in is in ful production and what that means isempowering the women recognizing the women and it's little things likehaving a crash in my Adminblov, where they can Troeki of and go to work thosesort of things that make me happy right. So sustainability was actually not thesat the start of my journey. I think it was just wanting to do somethingwanting to do good. I was actually talking to a friend of mine earlierthis morning, and I said you know we live in this world, particularly in thecurrent climate that we live and so...

...covid as impact as so many people.People have lost their lives right, but I won't. If I go my children, my fivechildren can tol around and say: Oh my God, look what she did. Look how sheimpacted like look at the difference she made to the women of Essant, thepeople whose are products and to our planet, because for me, sustainabilityis really about taking from my panent but giving itback replaneship. You know it's all aboutreplenishing and not clin our planet, and I made a pledge this year, but Iwould would not do that. That was a pleasure I make this year anddifficulty is that sheer butter? We talk about the benefits of Sheveda,which are enormous, however, ufto. Seventy percent waste, this beautiful,share, wattersentifice and way. If falle from the tree, you have toDehaskit that Husk is waste. You process it, you get the regide,which is the cake, that's waste. Today the Huss Are Brurned and their you knownanfills for the Cape, so the wast generated by Shar butter is huge. So that is an issue for me, so I cansay to a customer. When you pick up a job, my product, you can trace thismany ingrediemt back to source. You can, you know, see where it's from the Kingdom of ESTand feeling past the women and your empowering, but at the same time I'mstill playing the planet because were Stild, burning the heast and doing allthis stuff. So the way we're trying to balance that is trying to say, okay, this particularshare. Not I want to use everything everything that is yeah everything ofit, so the heart were looking at experiments with looking to a language.You know people make iniversity of bed for sure to try and transform thosehusts into Briquettes, which is but firewood for the locals, and the cakecan be more fertilizer, any more feed. So it's the e things that actuallydefine sustainability. For me, Oh Gosh, that is and you've gone, and that isliterally theres lent great great length, and I guess you find out with asmall indie brand, where you are focused on an individual thing, anindividual ingredient. You can go that extra mile it'll. Take you a little bitlonger because we don't have the funds behind US butit's. It's the coreprinciple I's your core ethic. It's ingrained in you, Bi think you know, I'm proud. I thinkwe should ave all be proud, because ive built a company that six on three solidpillars. The first we've talk about his eficacy products that work ones foryour skin natural. The second I co planet hugging is the Tayina Worldisstainability sustainable, packagein...

...national ingredients. All these tinshave talked about that hug our planet and then the thirdcules ethicalsourcing actually doing things well and farmy, which I see ar something simer.So for me that that's really important and it's that transparency actuallythat you've dont been so transparrent and said. Well, actually, I've gotnethe extra mile I've built these bactories ive, empowered hundreds ofwomen to you know work on the far on the infactory and you know create thishigh grade. Shar butter, but we're not perfect at there are floaws and we'restill working on that, and that's that's what's so beautiful and I thinkthat's one of the things that as an individual indie as a small indiebrand, you know we'll put our hands up andsort of say. Yes, we're still striving we're, not a hundred percent. There yeawe're doing our best, but you know things comein baby steps. You can dothis. My also, I also I mean, I think the other positive that I I can seecoming out of this is educating locals because very often, especiallyespecially, I think we we look at the cultures that we come from. They arevery similar in that lifestyles are very simplistic. You know, and it'salmost IMEAN. I think I sustainability an recycling it's almost ingrained intoin the most humorous of Waye. Sometimes it's unbelievable Inv Ein a newspaperback where we come from. Oh my God, you'll see it recycle to the end of itslife and theyond. You know until the fiveers of it come apart. You a knowwhat it's made o an yeah. You know I think, and what locals don't realizeits actually a positive impact that theyr having by doing that, andobviously here in the West, we've been able to break it down but Tho becauseof simplicity and e Tryi to make a living. That's that's ultimately whatit's Aposte Bo, uwith people like you sitting up it's sort of inspirational sort ofconcepts like this. I think you're also educating, which I think is soimportant for futer generations. I couldn't agree more because I mean Ithink it was march, two thousand, an nineteen where myself and my polleaguesTean a atew. Other people went from the UK to ssam and there were about threehundred and fifty women. We did the health and safety training for them.That was so it's so filfening. I guess the downside to some of these isbecause we are small, Indi brands. We havepurpose an impact in our da right. The problem with that ges be honest. Is that that kind of is driving our it'sdrive. That's out one of our cord drivers right. You know the fact thatthis natural thing has worked for our kids and the bat fact that we're makingan impact of people's a Lik that becomes a driver and then what happensat leasti happens to me. Profit comes last. Yeah Youso focused on thisamazing things. You're doing, but you know, I still believe that for us itwould build it. They will come it's...

...about the messaging out there. Thereare somebody said in a former Wasnin Resen, the two types of consumers, onebecausesumers wo, do their research and those want to be hand ed a solution we actually caut across Bookh, becausethere wasn't Watwe did ther research actually listen to our storeriesunderstanding. Why we've done what we've done- and I think like your brandas well, for us about keeping it simple, there's, no, there's nothing worse thanthe customer. Picking up peopre hat, I just can't you kow pronounce what's init is keep it simple, going back to nature, going back to our mooves, goingback to where what has worked for generation. Yeah was doing theirresearch, oh my goodness, buying to that and the ones who wanted to be hawho want to be had a asolution thinkit's great for xme. Great. Take your word for it type thing. Youknow, I think my brand- and I think yous as well, hasreally focused on people wisking conditions, they're, not cures, buttheir natural ways of managings kin conditions without the Nastis right. Soyou know supporting a managing things like Eximero rises. Dematigy is nolthis stuff except dry skin, but also, I think, it's important for us to say topeople out there that it's also a normal skin. I use my t it's also forpeople who want to maintain their skin as nature intendeexactly, and I thinthis is yet the this is literally the nail on the head. Theuge, it's thebeauty of so many of these gorgeous natural ingredients is that they aresuitable for all and it's just about how you use them or how they've beenformulated and with what they've been formulated, that you can then say yetthey're targeting thiscondition or this condition- or this is for very so Imean summer- is Archl for Musictur and she's, where she creates our bodyButtis, for example, or skin deep body, but is there's a different blend of ecentral oils and base oils that go with the sheer butter te coca butter and theManga butters that we use to target specific things, o specificconsent. And that's where you can say right. It is for all you've got it'sjust about having that knowledge on how to tweak ingredients so that they catedfor certain things. And it's wonderful so tell me more about the women thatyou work on the farm. They are assuming I'm assuming their local tribal women, asprobably Buo, wholiterally probably Ar bready earners of their household households, Basenot aboticluding man, because interm of Bein, the Facta wit, the News Lok we tryn to make everything localusing local builders, local, you know local materials etc, and these women...

...ordinarily, are they just the farmers.You know they make their share themselves and sell you in the seasonor thes sell thire's a lot of rice in SM, thees peanuts in Er sand. There'slots of mangos in thes, and so you know e. These are things that they wouldtypically do so. The environment we're trying to create for them is one thatdoesn't exist in Snd at the moment in terms of giving them a livelihoo giventhem jobs. I abvously adore these women. It is hard to work because I don'tspeak their language, it's my heritage in terms of being Igeriam, but I don'tspeak their language. So communication is glocal communication. Theyunderstand what we're trying to do. They understand that it's actuallybeautiful, OAS WIB is beautiful to watch and beautiful to communicate withthem, because they completely understand it i's not about takingtheir traditional methods away, it's about actually putting infanstructureto en hands so you're making it in your house. You can make it here and you getpaid for it. You have a job. Now you can open a bank account, you can havesavings. It goes way beyond. My business is naturally tribals game hereand the people that I involve with it. It really goes deep into the root oftrying to create a sustainable source of income for this people and that'swhat's so powerful, because you can it's your giving them their dignitytheire. You know they're independent they're able to provide for themselvesand their families, and it's not charity scraps. This is employment.This is you know your way to work. Your way out, you know, and that's soimportant to women or anybody in developingcountries- is to retain their dignity. Nobody wants to, you know, depend on handout and that'swhat so beautiful when you about really sourcing sustainably and ethically andhaving that social responsibility, it's to impower those nations or thosetribes or those villages, so that they can continue to flourish, and it's soand it's so similar to kind of our own little organ oil storyas well, whereby when we were looking just to source argonoil, we didn't goto your great length in opening up a ati wish. EEREAAMAZING watup your eyes.It really does because when we were in Morocco and Morocco is absolutelyflooded with women's cooperatives, that source or that provide organic Argonoil,and it's only when you actually dove- and you speak to these women- that youactually understand that the workterm it's an unregulated industry out therein any developing country. You know,...

...there's no government legislation toprotect these women, and so you find that when you do actually speak to them,it's not a cooperative, then don't have shares in the profit. It doesn't wittledown to the women. Does it the women are grinding hand grinding these? NotAn you actually then realize that? Actually, no, they aren't part of acooperative, it's just being termed that way. So I love that you said Istil love that you said that because I feel like I was being prisie at onepoint for saying: I'm anticorporative not not thatnot a good thing, but itdoes not wittle down to Fatima at home. It does not wittl down to in Afitur Omean, and I said Ino I don't want the corperative. I want we say trade, noteight Wentef, Ashtam, tre, noting beautiful, and that's what you shing. Ithink what we heare in the West. We are fed that, oh, it's, a women'scooperative. We have a very simple, very different outlook or anexpectation of what a women's copprative would be versus what itactually is when you developing countries- and that's that was a shock for summer-and I realizing actually this isn't what we thought a cooperative is andthat's not what, when we weren't happy so actually where we source are Arganoil from is the first thing the guy said was I'm not a cooperative, and Isaid that's fine and he was literally. He literally is a European Man Married to a localBerber woman. He had an Argan Fort Farm and he said I am not a cooperative, butI employ six hundred burber women and I paid them a o wage brilliant and welike wow and then he said the same thing very similar to what you guyshave set up in case of I have a crash. I have a classroom for their children,so they've got daycare, they can get education while they're alos workingand it's all singler. And then you thinking you know what that's a nobrainer. It doesn't matter if it's costing a little bit more, but that'swhat we want to subscribe to, as opposed to just claiming it's acooperative and knowing deep dowbt that it isn't. It's not benefiting anyoneand I think when we recognize their skill in that way, the passion and theloyalty comes from them. Oh, yes, and that all alwe Ne. So we as brands whenwe are selling a product, like you say, we're not selling itbecause of the propit we're making Oll the money where making we're selling it.Because we know it's pure and we know it works, and we know it's orfogenerations at when you combine it with that passion that comes from actuallypoducing. It byhand throug time through oof, the age old methods. Actuallythat'sright. That's right. Just add to that layer of the story. Doesn't it? Oh,it goes it becom. Does I kind of agree with you, because I'm also trying toI'm in tha place right now, where I'm...

...trying to get that balance between thebalance of what we're trying to do doing good in the world and actuallyruing e business. I think that's where sometimes it inde brands we kind of Falflat, because when you think about consumers in the west, where we'ntlucky to be in the Western world and have all thise privileges right andconssumers here, looking for things like GMO free, some tetychemical, freepard in free, not Dustan, animals, Vegan and all this stuff, but also theconsumes, are getting saviee and sadly, they looking for tracability yeah,there's lack of transparencys. So they want that transpantacy. They want thewant education. They want to know. What's in it, what are the ingredients and in this heavey saturated industry,we have to do the God, go the extra mile to stand out right if y want osell up ats. Ultimately, we want to sell because the more we sell ourproducts, the more we're able to support everything weve just said wit,an I moral kind of ACTC. So we have to Seuporus to be able to do that rightand in an industry that generates over a hundred and twenty billion onResycablo Plas. We doin our bit to actually speak tosustainability. There are so many facets to our businesses and that's whyI said to you: Indie Brans, coming together and doing this and not seeingeach other's competition, but actually raising our voice to save people. Wehave. We have similar stories. This is why we're doing what we're doing yeah.I know that there is so much talk right now in the industry. Obout clean beauty.I am sick of hearing that faceclean bauty. I do. I do use it because Iseems to be what the consumer Wans to hear, but crean bauty is subjective. Itmeans so many different things to so many people, ISS aget to the wholeNatural Vesus, organic theanish. You know so you know for me. I thinksomebody said to me talk about green beauty instead, and I love that becausegreen beauty speaks to how wer impacted our footprint on this planet, how we'reimpact in the environment that we live in and I think that's all we're tryingto do what hyou call it clean beauty or rain beauty or conscious beauty. I A another thing I decied to do right,you're, wrong. Ye was top focusin on the negatives and focus on thepositives, and what I mean by that is: Oh God, how many times do we say fromAlwar free from parbins? Where free from this we're free from that, and wedon't speak enough ORF. What we're good for yeah I'd rather talk about Shar, but im thebenefits about aganaal about your Lang, you land, but Larry Stage about Goraine.You Man, all this amazing things that we're doing. That's. Why I call my boesbuddy feels because their food I use not make Cinamon. You know I mean awhat I be having those stories that actually going down the free from room.I think that's what differentiatesas as...

Binde brands, you obviously are aprimary producer, not just as supply and notit. You know you create fromsource how easy is tracability for you, OT, almost almost like communicate toyour customers, yes, but and another excellent question and were still ther.I still a working we're still working on it. It's working por o because it'seasier for us in a way because we can trace back to SSM right now, we're alsodoing in Essen. Is it's been a labor of love. Hi's been hed on ate I's, beenwell worth it where wie divided it into. I think it's o o Gnki. I I get thiswrong. I think it's five to five fucs on five main villages, then loads ofvimages, but we've chosen five central villages to be collection, points. Okay,so each of this areas that we've chosen has its own scale and it's an areawhere a lot of you know rural people bring in their sharenas when we weighthem and check them. Now, when it comes into the factory, it's now puttingsections, so we know which region it comes from which village it comes fromwe now it's talk from Esadic Okayr, breaking it down to where in Sam hasthis not come from so when we converted to Buntar. We then know all this region that thebutter from this region seems to be absolutely incredible. That becomes afocus for you for your skin care, because you think in Oh. This isincredible, so we're thinking about in the next three to five years and funds.Prob forbid thing is real. Looking at blockchain, maybe hes in Bocsin tolagyto actually trades back to can trace back to the region. We can'ttrace back to the tree and ID lot to trase back the Tro we loke to traceback the woman who picke the mat from e. That would be awesome. That would beincredible, but that's down the line right, but that tracsability is reallyreally important. We actually had one of our stockes one of our very firstopis natures corner in newbry and love those guys. These two women boughttheir tickets gone a play. I came to ssam well well to see this thing.That's in their shelf in new Braty Hav, a letlets actually take this journeywith you and Ilovand. That's the beauty of independent businesses and brandshut. It's so much more personal likebecome just about the profit. ITBECOMES INGRAINED! It's more about the story, the IMPAT that you're having on so many different levels, like you,said from the end consumer to the women who you've empowered to be able toharvest and process the IME pact that we're having, though, because you'rehaving the same impactin morcause. If you think about it, you might not havea factor te, but in a way you do...

...because you can do the same level oftracability you. Yes, yes, we can weve. So we yeah we weare able to say thatit's single origin from a tracte from a Tis tisform Al Right, but it's just itjust goes to show you how how much of an impact and how profoundit can be just making these mall changes, because it's a huge it makessuch a profound difference to livelihoods. I guess it has to because the world we'reliving in today. We have to do you know, I always say God ot the days of Niceand shining when people squash this surface I's gon to be something ofsubstance behind it and that's what we Creatou I feel like. We could just talkto you salong for absolutely hours and hours an end, but I know we have to cutit short heire. Thank you so much for joining us and sharing your nuggets ofwisdom. Thank you so much. Oh! Thank you guys, because this this has beenamazing. It hasn't felt like it's podcast is feel like US having toweakly Bradon Conversation Right Itwe. Thank you for that than Thankyo. GiveMe Yo opportunity and thank you for making an inclusive forum O. Thank youfor joining Gus and sharing your gorgeous story, and hopefully we willbe back from our next podcast very soon next month. Take Care Byebye.

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